Posts tagged electronics

Workshops at BetaLab

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In the next weeks we’ll be giving two workshops at Beta­Lab, a co-working space orga­ni­zed by betahaus| within the Chiado-After-Work program.

Here’s all the infor­ma­tion and workshops’ sche­dule (in Portuguese):

Workshop DIY Kine­tic Solar­Bots — Cons­trua o seu pró­prio robot ciné­tico solar.

Neste workshop os par­ti­ci­pan­tes vão cons­truir um pequeno robot ciné­tico atra­vés da mon­ta­gem de um cir­cuito solar com um pequeno motor e do design/modelagem do corpo do robot com Shmel­zo­lan (plás­tico uti­li­zado em artesanato).

Datas : 12 de Maio / 19 de Maio / 26 de Maio

Horá­rio : 17h — 21h

Preço : 25 Euros/Pessoa

Local : Rua Gar­rett, 70 (Baixa, Lisboa)

CC : Video by xda­te­lier (http://xdatelier.org/)

Workshop Elec­tró­nica Apren­der a soldar

Qual­quer pes­soa é capaz de fazer uma boa sol­da­dura, é só uma ques­tão de prá­tica! Neste workshop apren­de­mos a sol­dar cons­truindo cir­cui­tos muito diver­ti­dos como o Pisca-Pisca LED, uPONG (Retro Video GAME), Draw­dio (um lápis/pincel que emite sons enquanto dese­nhá­mos) entre outros.

Datas : 14 de Maio / 21 de Maio / 28 de Maio

Horá­rio : 17h — 21h

Preço : entre 10 — 35  Euros/Pessoa (con­so­ante o kit selec­ci­o­nado para construir)

Local : Rua Gar­rett, 70 (Baixa, Lisboa)

CC : Photo by LadyAda (www.adafruit.com)

A ins­cri­ção para qual­quer um dos workshops numa das das dis­po­ní­veis deve ser efec­tu­ada via email para o ende­reço : daniela@betahaus.de

Mini-workshop “Motores de Passo”

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(scroll down for English)

Vamos pegar ale­a­tó­ri­a­mente num motor de passo e ten­tar des­co­brir que tipo de motor é, dese­nhar um dia­grama sim­ples do mesmo.
Depois vamos pegar no ferro de sol­dar (não há que ter mee­e­e­e­edo :)) e mon­tar um cir­cuito que per­mite con­tro­lar esse motor a par­tir de um Arduino ou qual­quer outra placa base­ada num micro­con­tro­la­dor.
Todo o mate­rial é for­ne­cido e fica para os par­ti­ci­pan­tes, sendo ape­nas neces­sá­rio tra­zer ferro de sol­dar e mul­ti­me­tro (ou espe­rar que alguma alma cari­dosa vos empreste).

O número de par­ti­ci­pan­tes é limi­tado pelo que, se dis­se­rem que vêm, con­ta­mos MEEESMO convosco ;)

Para ins­cri­ções e pedi­dos de infor­ma­ção: workshops /arroba/ audienciazero.org
Lota­ção máxima de 10 par­ti­ci­pan­tes
Sábado 13 de Março de 2010
AltLab em Caci­lhas
14h00m
5€


Let’s each of us pick up a ran­dom step­per and try to find out what kind of step­per it is, draw a sim­ple dia­gram.
Then pick up the sol­de­ring iron (have noo­o­ooo fear :)) and assem­ble a cir­cuit to con­trol that motor from an Arduino or any other microcontroller-based board.
All mate­ri­als are sup­plied to the par­ti­ci­pants and everyone gets to keep them; you’re just requi­red to bring your own sol­de­ring iron and mul­ti­me­ter (or wait a ran­dom amount of time to bor­row some­one else’s).

The num­ber of par­ti­ci­pa­ti­ons is limi­ted, the­re­fore, if you tell us you’ll come, we’ll REEEALLY be wai­ting for you ;)

For regis­tra­tion and infor­ma­tion requests: workshops /at/ audienciazero.org
Maxi­mum of 10 par­ti­ci­pants
Satur­day, March 13 2010
AltLab @ Caci­lhas
14h00m
5€

First Soft Circuits Open Lab

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soft circuits open lab

This Sun­day we’re hol­ding our first Soft Cir­cuits Open Lab at the School of Fine Arts in Lis­bon (FBAUL — Facul­dade de Belas Artes de Lis­boa). There is no pre­de­fi­ned struc­ture for the event. We will meet for the course of one day with the pur­po­ses of sha­ring kno­wledge, expe­ri­men­ting fre­ely, advan­cing on-going pro­jects, and just having fun wor­king together. Some of the peo­ple atten­ding will be spe­ci­a­lists in elec­tro­nics and others in tex­ti­les. Bar­camp style impromptu pre­sen­ta­ti­ons are very welcome.

Altlab will pro­vide some basic tools such as pli­ers, scis­sors, sol­de­ring irons, iro­ning board, etc. But par­ti­ci­pants must bring all the mate­ri­als and addi­ti­o­nal equip­ment neces­sary for their own projects/experiments (inclu­ding lap­tops). Here are some sug­ges­ti­ons: any kind of fabric, nee­dles and thread, yarn, t-shirts, con­duc­tive and/or resis­tive fabric, con­duc­tive thread, con­duc­tive and/or resis­tive yarn, knit­ting and/or cro­chet nee­dles, LEDs, coin cell bat­te­ries, bat­tery hol­ders, EL wire, strands of fiber optics, cop­per foil, cop­per adhe­sive track, alu­mi­num foil, resis­tive foam, regu­lar foam, ardui­nos (lily­pad or any other kind). If you’ve never wor­ked with any of these mate­ri­als and don’t have them handy, come anyway, you can help some­one else with their pro­ject and learn along the way.

For more infor­ma­tion on soft cir­cuits tech­ni­ques and mate­ri­als, check out the Soft Cir­cuits Resour­ces sec­tion on the open­Ma­te­ri­als wiki.

This open lab will take place on Febru­ary 21st, from 10:30 to 18:30, at the School of Fine Arts in Lis­bon, room 307, 1st floor (since our own space is still under cons­truc­tion). All are wel­come, there is no fee nor regis­tra­tion, but ple­ase do let me know if you are plan­ning on coming: catarinamota(at)audienciazero.org

Circuit Bending

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Hello “intre­nets” people(s)

This post today reflects a lit­tle about  what cir­cuit ben­ding and diy are.

I have many fri­ends and col­le­a­gues  asking me “-So what is cir­cuit ben­ding?”, well here goes the awser and a bit of the his­tory behind cir­cuit bending.

Seems that a guy cal­led Reed Gha­zala, was making expe­ri­ments with some synthe­si­zers, trying to get some more sounds out of the elec­tro­nic ins­tru­ments, so he deci­ded to open one and poke the guts of the beast .

He soon  finds out that the core of an elec­tro­nic ins­tru­ment its a lot of fun and this could be exci­ting discover.

Now…have you ever heard of the Savant syn­drome ?  a per­son who as Savant Syn­drome have the abi­lity of mixing emo­ti­ons, like seeing num­bers in a wide vari­ety of colors or the alpha­bet in sha­pes and forms, the cause of this, its sim­ply the brain and some short fuses in some areas, and this its exac­tly what Cir­cuit ben­ding is.

So, when Reed deci­ded to explore the pos­si­bi­lity of the short cir­cuit he open a big door for expe­ri­men­tal music and a new form of seeing elec­tro­nic devi­ces, the idea its sim­ply bril­li­ant, lets open some toys, synths, pedals (wha­te­ver) and lets start to take some really cool sounds out of it, and the bril­li­ant part is : you don’t need to know about elec­tro­nics or be a geek who spent all day in the garage (myself inclu­ded), because cir­cuit ben­ding its like a a brain in short fuse.

What you need to cir­cuit ben­ding some stuff ?  This is another ques­tion and an impor­tant one. Hummm lets see:

First, you will need some kind of device that pro­du­ces sound, like a toy, a dis­tor­tion pedal, an old synth just to name a few.

Second, this is the impor­tant part DON’T USE ANYTHING THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE AC/DC POWER, this means DEATH, ins­tead use bat­te­ries, all kinds of bat­te­ries and even trans­for­mers as long you don’t touch that evil 220 V you are in business .

Third, open your device and cho­ose your method of ope­ra­tion, this could be done in a vari­ety of ways, you could use your fin­gers with a lit­tle of saliva (ughhh), or two screw dri­vers con­nec­ted by an alli­ga­tor clip.

Four, explore and see if the device reacts to your touch poking some cir­cuits, i often get some great results poking the chips legs and con­nec­ting them together, fin­ding the cool points its fun so don’t give up if you don’t find something in the first 5 minutes.

Five, ohh the “intre­nets” yes there’s a lot in here just search a bit and you will find your­self in a brand new world, of course the cir­cuit ben­ding com­mu­nity its open min­ded and fri­en­dly, so don’t be shy and ask ques­ti­ons (most of us don’t know what are doing so join the club).

Now you know were Beck, Madonna, Mike Pat­ton and many others are get­ting they ins­pi­ra­tion (yeah that’s right Madonna), the musi­cal pos­si­bi­lity are immense, just think  is you, who  are dis­co­ve­ring your own sounds and making it at the same time (not like a patch in a synthe­si­zer ) something really new and fresh made enti­rely  by you.

So,  what is Cir­cuit Bending  ?

PAPERduino’s design

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This is a fully func­ti­o­nal ver­sion of the Arduino. We eli­mi­na­ted the PCB and use paper and card­bo­ard as sup­port and the result is.. the PAPER­duino :D

This is the the first ver­sion of the layout design, next we will try more designs, and other mate­ri­als. You just need to print the top and the bot­tom layouts, and glue them to any kind of sup­port you want. We hope that you start making your own boards. If you do, ple­ase share your pho­tos with us, we would love to see them ;)

There is no USB direct con­nec­tion, so to pro­gram the paper­duino you will need some kind of FTDI cable or adap­ter. One of this pro­ducts will be fine:
FTDI cable from Ada­fruit Indus­tries
FTDI adap­ter from Sparkfun

Down­load PDF

Com­po­nents list:
1 x 7805 Vol­tage regu­la­tor
2 x LEDs (dif­fe­rent colors)
2 x 560 Ohm resis­tors (between 220oHm and 1K)
1 x 10k Ohm resis­tor
2 x 100 uF capa­ci­tors
1x 16 MHz clock crys­tal
2 x 22 pF capa­ci­tors
1 x 0.01 uF capa­ci­tor
1 x but­ton
1 x Atmel ATMega168
1 x soc­ket 28 pin
Female and Male headers

Ins­truc­ti­ons:
Use a nee­dle to punc­ture the holes for your components.

Don’t rush, place one com­po­nent after another and do all the sol­der work carefully.

Fol­low the con­nec­tion lines.

And this should be the final look of your paper­duino connections.

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