First Soft Circuits Open Lab

soft circuits open lab

This Sun­day we’re hold­ing our first Soft Cir­cuits Open Lab at the School of Fine Arts in Lis­bon (FBAUL — Fac­ul­dade de Belas Artes de Lis­boa). There is no pre­de­fined struc­ture for the event. We will meet for the course of one day with the pur­poses of shar­ing knowl­edge, exper­i­ment­ing freely, advanc­ing on-going projects, and just hav­ing fun work­ing together. Some of the peo­ple attend­ing will be spe­cial­ists in elec­tron­ics and oth­ers in tex­tiles. Bar­camp style impromptu pre­sen­ta­tions are very wel­come.

Alt­lab will pro­vide some basic tools such as pli­ers, scis­sors, sol­der­ing irons, iron­ing board, etc. But par­tic­i­pants must bring all the mate­ri­als and addi­tional equip­ment nec­es­sary for their own projects/experiments (includ­ing lap­tops). Here are some sug­ges­tions: any kind of fab­ric, nee­dles and thread, yarn, t-shirts, con­duc­tive and/or resis­tive fab­ric, con­duc­tive thread, con­duc­tive and/or resis­tive yarn, knit­ting and/or cro­chet nee­dles, LEDs, coin cell bat­ter­ies, bat­tery hold­ers, EL wire, strands of fiber optics, cop­per foil, cop­per adhe­sive track, alu­minum foil, resis­tive foam, reg­u­lar foam, arduinos (lily­pad or any other kind). If you’ve never worked with any of these mate­ri­als and don’t have them handy, come any­way, you can help some­one else with their project and learn along the way.

For more infor­ma­tion on soft cir­cuits tech­niques and mate­ri­als, check out the Soft Cir­cuits Resources sec­tion on the open­Ma­te­ri­als wiki.

This open lab will take place on Feb­ru­ary 21st, from 10:30 to 18:30, at the School of Fine Arts in Lis­bon, room 307, 1st floor (since our own space is still under con­struc­tion). All are wel­come, there is no fee nor reg­is­tra­tion, but please do let me know if you are plan­ning on com­ing: catarinamota(at)audienciazero.org

Drum Pads

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Hey.

Four drum pads ready to go.

All made of old mate­r­ial found in the Alt/Lab instal­la­tions, and a very spe­cial big thankxxx for Mónica who brought the cas­ings (we are going back to that in a moment) for the drum pads.

So the idea was to make drum pads that we could hook up to a sound card(or what­ever) and them make sweet music, this is a very nice com­bi­na­tion between piezo­elec­tric com­po­nents and a few lay­ers of some absorbent sound  mate­r­ial like rub­ber or cork foil (that’s what we use because there was noth­ing more) and a piece of alu­minum foil for a greater drum area .

We use an old can (20l) of paint, four piezo­elec­tric found in elec­tronic junk like old modems and old tele­phones, wire for con­nect­ing the piezos, cork foil for insu­la­tion the drum pad area and Mónica sup­ply the cas­ings (square rub­ber cd´s stands), and glue for putting every­thing nice and tight .

First we cut a piece of the can (cir­cu­lar about 10cm radius)and we glued the piezo into it, then we drilled one hole into the rub­ber cas­ing for the wires to came out, them we cut two square cork foil parts (the first in the bot­tom of the cas­ing and the other for the top) a bit of glue and that’s it drum pads ready to rock.

Now we got some audio com­ing out of the pads but thats just bor­ing because its always the same and we want to go fur­ther like trans­form­ing audio into midi mes­sages, and we found the right tool for it, its called  “KTDrumTrig­ger” and he trans­forms the audio sig­nal into midi notes, we can use this midi notes inside a sequencer pro­gram to con­trol any kind of instru­ment (either VSTI or some other stuff), in our case we use the drum pads to con­trol “Bat­tery” and thats it instant fun.

There are some other links and some other ideas for drum pads. This “one“uses ardunio as a source for the imput sig­nal.

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