food for your stomach


Fee­ding 15 sle­ep depri­ved hac­kers is not an easy task and during the AZ Resi­dency only 3 peo­ple were bra­ve enough to put their culi­nary talents to the test: Joel, Vitor and Mari­a­na. Everyo­ne agre­ed that their home­ma­de meals were awe­so­me and no bug reports were filed. Sin­ce we beli­e­ve in sha­ring, here are Joel’s deli­ci­ous open sour­ce reci­pes (in fren­ch com­me il faut):

Salad Dres­sing [ VO ]

4 cuillè­re à sou­pe d’huile d’olive
3 cuillè­re à sou­pe de vinai­gre bal­sa­mi­que
2 cuillè­re à café de miel
sel
poi­vre

Goû­ter et ajus­ter : si trop sucré, ajou­ter du vinai­gre / si trop amer, ajou­ter du miel.

Bask Chic­ken [ VO ]

Pré­voir un bon mor­ce­au de pou­let pour cha­cun des invi­tés
Poi­vron
Toma­te
Sau­ce toma­te
Oig­non
sel
poi­vre
Eau

Con­ti­nue rea­ding “food for your sto­ma­ch”

makerbot as microscope: what we learned

Joel Belou­et has been wor­king on an art pie­ce invol­ving micro­or­ga­nisms and nee­ded a sup­port struc­tu­re for his micros­co­pe came­ra. It turns out the Maker­Bot sit­ting on our table was the solu­ti­on.

At first Joel atta­ched the came­ra to the z axis and the sli­de res­ted on the build plat­form, but it soon beca­me cle­ar that it would be much bet­ter to have the sam­ple remain still and the came­ra move ins­te­ad. Inver­ting the posi­ti­ons meant atta­ching the sli­de to the bot­tom of the z axis plat­form in order to pre­vent the came­ra lens from bum­ping against it. This setup also allowed him to use the z crank as a focus mecha­nism. Con­ti­nue rea­ding “maker­bot as micros­co­pe: what we lear­ned”

Thom Yorke 3D Print by Tiago Serra

During our recent 3D Prin­ting Workshop, Tia­go Ser­ra from xDA used altlab’s Maker­Bot to print a model of Thom York’s head 🙂

Ori­gi­nal point cloud data from Aaron Koblin’s Hou­se of Cards (GeoVideo’s 3D scan­ning sys­tem)

Meshed with Point Cloud Skin­ner script for Blen­der

Cle­a­nup in Mesh­Lab

Made during the Maker­bot workshop with Zach Hoe­ken at Lis­bon Tech Uni­ver­sity

Down­lo­ad the file at Thin­gi­ver­se

Awe­so­me Cre­a­ti­ve­Com­mons post :
creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/18970

Maker­bot Indus­tri­es
makerbot.com

Drum Pads

drumpads1drumpads2

Hey.

Four drum pads ready to go.

All made of old mate­ri­al found in the Alt/Lab ins­tal­la­ti­ons, and a very spe­ci­al big thankxxx for Móni­ca who brought the casings (we are going back to that in a moment) for the drum pads.

So the idea was to make drum pads that we could hook up to a sound card(or wha­te­ver) and them make swe­et music, this is a very nice com­bi­na­ti­on betwe­en pie­zo­e­lec­tric com­po­nents and a few layers of some absor­bent sound  mate­ri­al like rub­ber or cork foil (that’s what we use becau­se the­re was nothing more) and a pie­ce of alu­mi­num foil for a gre­a­ter drum area .

We use an old can (20l) of paint, four pie­zo­e­lec­tric found in elec­tro­nic junk like old modems and old telepho­nes, wire for con­nec­ting the pie­zos, cork foil for insu­la­ti­on the drum pad area and Móni­ca sup­ply the casings (squa­re rub­ber cd´s stands), and glue for put­ting everything nice and tight .

First we cut a pie­ce of the can (cir­cu­lar about 10cm radius)and we glu­ed the pie­zo into it, then we dril­led one hole into the rub­ber casing for the wires to came out, them we cut two squa­re cork foil parts (the first in the bot­tom of the casing and the other for the top) a bit of glue and that’s it drum pads ready to rock.

Now we got some audio coming out of the pads but thats just boring becau­se its always the same and we want to go further like trans­for­ming audio into midi mes­sa­ges, and we found the right tool for it, its cal­led  “KTDrum­Trig­ger” and he trans­forms the audio sig­nal into midi notes, we can use this midi notes insi­de a sequen­cer pro­gram to con­trol any kind of ins­tru­ment (either VSTI or some other stuff), in our case we use the drum pads to con­trol “Bat­tery” and thats it ins­tant fun.

The­re are some other links and some other ide­as for drum pads. This “one“uses ardu­nio as a sour­ce for the imput sig­nal.

drumpads3