Projects

makerbot as microscope: what we learned

Joel Belouet has been wor­king on an art piece invol­ving micro­or­ga­nisms and nee­ded a sup­port struc­ture for his micros­cope camera. It turns out the Maker­Bot sit­ting on our table was the solution.

At first Joel atta­ched the camera to the z axis and the slide res­ted on the build plat­form, but it soon became clear that it would be much bet­ter to have the sam­ple remain still and the camera move ins­tead. Inver­ting the posi­ti­ons meant atta­ching the slide to the bot­tom of the z axis plat­form in order to pre­vent the camera lens from bum­ping against it. This setup also allowed him to use the z crank as a focus mecha­nism. (more…)

Thom Yorke 3D Print by Tiago Serra

During our recent 3D Prin­ting Workshop, Tiago Serra from xDA used altlab’s Maker­Bot to print a model of Thom York’s head :)

Ori­gi­nal point cloud data from Aaron Koblin’s House of Cards (GeoVideo’s 3D scan­ning system)

Meshed with Point Cloud Skin­ner script for Blender

Cle­a­nup in Mesh­Lab

Made during the Maker­bot workshop with Zach Hoe­ken at Lis­bon Tech University

Down­load the file at Thin­gi­verse

Awe­some Cre­a­ti­ve­Com­mons post :
creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/18970

Maker­bot Indus­tries
makerbot.com

Drum Pads

drumpads1drumpads2

Hey.

Four drum pads ready to go.

All made of old mate­rial found in the Alt/Lab ins­tal­la­ti­ons, and a very spe­cial big thankxxx for Mónica who brought the casings (we are going back to that in a moment) for the drum pads.

So the idea was to make drum pads that we could hook up to a sound card(or wha­te­ver) and them make sweet music, this is a very nice com­bi­na­tion between pie­zo­e­lec­tric com­po­nents and a few layers of some absor­bent sound  mate­rial like rub­ber or cork foil (that’s what we use because there was nothing more) and a piece of alu­mi­num foil for a gre­a­ter drum area .

We use an old can (20l) of paint, four pie­zo­e­lec­tric found in elec­tro­nic junk like old modems and old telepho­nes, wire for con­nec­ting the pie­zos, cork foil for insu­la­tion the drum pad area and Mónica sup­ply the casings (square rub­ber cd´s stands), and glue for put­ting everything nice and tight .

First we cut a piece of the can (cir­cu­lar about 10cm radius)and we glued the piezo into it, then we dril­led one hole into the rub­ber casing for the wires to came out, them we cut two square cork foil parts (the first in the bot­tom of the casing and the other for the top) a bit of glue and that’s it drum pads ready to rock.

Now we got some audio coming out of the pads but thats just boring because its always the same and we want to go further like trans­for­ming audio into midi mes­sa­ges, and we found the right tool for it, its cal­led  “KTDrum­Trig­ger” and he trans­forms the audio sig­nal into midi notes, we can use this midi notes inside a sequen­cer pro­gram to con­trol any kind of ins­tru­ment (either VSTI or some other stuff), in our case we use the drum pads to con­trol “Bat­tery” and thats it ins­tant fun.

There are some other links and some other ideas for drum pads. This “one“uses ardu­nio as a source for the imput signal.

drumpads3

Project Helicam

Helicam Sketches

Heli­cam is an AltLab pro­ject that emer­ged from the wish to cap­ture ima­ges from the sky with a WiFi ena­bled camera so that one can see what’s being shot from a dif­fe­rent pers­pec­tive and in real-time. This appro­ach may lead to new para­digms in visual pers­pec­ti­ves by ena­bling sho­o­ting from air views at a con­si­de­ra­bly low cost and also so close that can­not be easily done from a helicopter.

As a real exam­ple, one of the pro­jects to accom­plish with Heli­cam is for tes­ting for local forests sur­veil­lance and use in rela­ted rese­arch pro­jects, as with forest fire pre­ven­tion for sus­tai­na­bi­lity. Other pos­si­ble ope­ra­tion fields can be archi­tec­ture, buil­ding sur­veil­lance or even artis­tic per­for­mance envi­ron­ments where mul­ti­me­dia has a strong presence.

The main idea is to build an inex­pen­sive and fle­xi­ble plat­form using – as a star­ting point – spe­ci­fi­ca­ti­ons made avai­la­ble by seve­ral open source pro­jects avai­la­ble online (like Mikro­kop­ter or UAVP-NG). After doing some ini­tial rese­arch and costs eva­lu­a­tion we rea­li­zed that we can­not make this pro­totype with the resour­ces cur­ren­tly avai­la­ble within the group mem­bers or AltLab and the­re­fore we star­ted to seek for some kind of spon­sorship. I have to say that we were lucky since with only two con­tacts made, we were able to fun­draise money in order to build a flying pro­totype accor­ding to our ini­tial costs pre­dic­ti­ons. Thank you Mob­bit for accep­ting our proposal!!

If you wanna join us in this pro­ject stop by AltLab in one of our regu­lar Tues­day night meetings.

Make your own game-pad!

…Don’t let others tell you how many but­tons you can press at once, these are times of freedom :)

This is a home­made game-pad with just one acce­le­ro­me­ter (a bre­a­kout board from Spark­fun) and one push-button.

custom game-pad with accelerometer and push-button connected to arduino

Using a sim­ple, cus­tom pro­to­col and a C# lis­te­ner we could play Acce­le­roids, an Aste­roids lost sibling on Ste­roids, which uses the acce­le­ro­me­ter to con­trol the ship and the but­ton to shoot.

next steps will be to turn this into a gene­ric game-pad by simu­la­ting key­bo­ard key pres­ses for any sen­sor you throw at the Arduino, allowing you to cre­ate truly funky pads to con­trol your favou­rite game. Stay tuned! ;)

Edit: We were aler­ted by fri­en­dly com­ments that this pro­ject resem­bles another project/tutorial that can be found here: http://lusorobotica.com/index.php/topic,902.0.html

PAPERduino’s design

This is a fully func­ti­o­nal ver­sion of the Arduino. We eli­mi­na­ted the PCB and use paper and card­bo­ard as sup­port and the result is.. the PAPER­duino :D

This is the the first ver­sion of the layout design, next we will try more designs, and other mate­ri­als. You just need to print the top and the bot­tom layouts, and glue them to any kind of sup­port you want. We hope that you start making your own boards. If you do, ple­ase share your pho­tos with us, we would love to see them ;)

There is no USB direct con­nec­tion, so to pro­gram the paper­duino you will need some kind of FTDI cable or adap­ter. One of this pro­ducts will be fine:
FTDI cable from Ada­fruit Indus­tries
FTDI adap­ter from Sparkfun

Down­load PDF

Com­po­nents list:
1 x 7805 Vol­tage regu­la­tor
2 x LEDs (dif­fe­rent colors)
2 x 560 Ohm resis­tors (between 220oHm and 1K)
1 x 10k Ohm resis­tor
2 x 100 uF capa­ci­tors
1x 16 MHz clock crys­tal
2 x 22 pF capa­ci­tors
1 x 0.01 uF capa­ci­tor
1 x but­ton
1 x Atmel ATMega168
1 x soc­ket 28 pin
Female and Male headers

Ins­truc­ti­ons:
Use a nee­dle to punc­ture the holes for your components.

Don’t rush, place one com­po­nent after another and do all the sol­der work carefully.

Fol­low the con­nec­tion lines.

And this should be the final look of your paper­duino connections.

Go to Top