Posts tagged recycle

Mini-workshop “Motores de Passo”

(scroll down for English)

Vamos pegar ale­a­tó­ri­a­mente num motor de passo e ten­tar des­co­brir que tipo de motor é, dese­nhar um dia­grama sim­ples do mesmo.
Depois vamos pegar no ferro de sol­dar (não há que ter mee­e­e­e­edo :)) e mon­tar um cir­cuito que per­mite con­tro­lar esse motor a par­tir de um Arduino ou qual­quer outra placa base­ada num micro­con­tro­la­dor.
Todo o mate­rial é for­ne­cido e fica para os par­ti­ci­pan­tes, sendo ape­nas neces­sá­rio tra­zer ferro de sol­dar e mul­ti­me­tro (ou espe­rar que alguma alma cari­dosa vos empreste).

O número de par­ti­ci­pan­tes é limi­tado pelo que, se dis­se­rem que vêm, con­ta­mos MEEESMO convosco ;)

Para ins­cri­ções e pedi­dos de infor­ma­ção: workshops /arroba/ audienciazero.org
Lota­ção máxima de 10 par­ti­ci­pan­tes
Sábado 13 de Março de 2010
AltLab em Caci­lhas
14h00m
5€


Let’s each of us pick up a ran­dom step­per and try to find out what kind of step­per it is, draw a sim­ple dia­gram.
Then pick up the sol­de­ring iron (have noo­o­ooo fear :)) and assem­ble a cir­cuit to con­trol that motor from an Arduino or any other microcontroller-based board.
All mate­ri­als are sup­plied to the par­ti­ci­pants and everyone gets to keep them; you’re just requi­red to bring your own sol­de­ring iron and mul­ti­me­ter (or wait a ran­dom amount of time to bor­row some­one else’s).

The num­ber of par­ti­ci­pa­ti­ons is limi­ted, the­re­fore, if you tell us you’ll come, we’ll REEEALLY be wai­ting for you ;)

For regis­tra­tion and infor­ma­tion requests: workshops /at/ audienciazero.org
Maxi­mum of 10 par­ti­ci­pants
Satur­day, March 13 2010
AltLab @ Caci­lhas
14h00m
5€

Drum Pads

drumpads1drumpads2

Hey.

Four drum pads ready to go.

All made of old mate­rial found in the Alt/Lab ins­tal­la­ti­ons, and a very spe­cial big thankxxx for Mónica who brought the casings (we are going back to that in a moment) for the drum pads.

So the idea was to make drum pads that we could hook up to a sound card(or wha­te­ver) and them make sweet music, this is a very nice com­bi­na­tion between pie­zo­e­lec­tric com­po­nents and a few layers of some absor­bent sound  mate­rial like rub­ber or cork foil (that’s what we use because there was nothing more) and a piece of alu­mi­num foil for a gre­a­ter drum area .

We use an old can (20l) of paint, four pie­zo­e­lec­tric found in elec­tro­nic junk like old modems and old telepho­nes, wire for con­nec­ting the pie­zos, cork foil for insu­la­tion the drum pad area and Mónica sup­ply the casings (square rub­ber cd´s stands), and glue for put­ting everything nice and tight .

First we cut a piece of the can (cir­cu­lar about 10cm radius)and we glued the piezo into it, then we dril­led one hole into the rub­ber casing for the wires to came out, them we cut two square cork foil parts (the first in the bot­tom of the casing and the other for the top) a bit of glue and that’s it drum pads ready to rock.

Now we got some audio coming out of the pads but thats just boring because its always the same and we want to go further like trans­for­ming audio into midi mes­sa­ges, and we found the right tool for it, its cal­led  “KTDrum­Trig­ger” and he trans­forms the audio sig­nal into midi notes, we can use this midi notes inside a sequen­cer pro­gram to con­trol any kind of ins­tru­ment (either VSTI or some other stuff), in our case we use the drum pads to con­trol “Bat­tery” and thats it ins­tant fun.

There are some other links and some other ideas for drum pads. This “one“uses ardu­nio as a source for the imput signal.

drumpads3

PAPERduino’s design

This is a fully func­ti­o­nal ver­sion of the Arduino. We eli­mi­na­ted the PCB and use paper and card­bo­ard as sup­port and the result is.. the PAPER­duino :D

This is the the first ver­sion of the layout design, next we will try more designs, and other mate­ri­als. You just need to print the top and the bot­tom layouts, and glue them to any kind of sup­port you want. We hope that you start making your own boards. If you do, ple­ase share your pho­tos with us, we would love to see them ;)

There is no USB direct con­nec­tion, so to pro­gram the paper­duino you will need some kind of FTDI cable or adap­ter. One of this pro­ducts will be fine:
FTDI cable from Ada­fruit Indus­tries
FTDI adap­ter from Sparkfun

Down­load PDF

Com­po­nents list:
1 x 7805 Vol­tage regu­la­tor
2 x LEDs (dif­fe­rent colors)
2 x 560 Ohm resis­tors (between 220oHm and 1K)
1 x 10k Ohm resis­tor
2 x 100 uF capa­ci­tors
1x 16 MHz clock crys­tal
2 x 22 pF capa­ci­tors
1 x 0.01 uF capa­ci­tor
1 x but­ton
1 x Atmel ATMega168
1 x soc­ket 28 pin
Female and Male headers

Ins­truc­ti­ons:
Use a nee­dle to punc­ture the holes for your components.

Don’t rush, place one com­po­nent after another and do all the sol­der work carefully.

Fol­low the con­nec­tion lines.

And this should be the final look of your paper­duino connections.

openMaterials :: research project

openMaterials
My dear fri­end Kisty Boyle and I recen­tly laun­ched open­Ma­te­ri­als — a col­la­bo­ra­tive rese­arch pro­ject dedi­ca­ted to open inves­ti­ga­tion and expe­ri­men­ta­tion with DIY pro­duc­tion methods and uses of mate­ri­als. In the spi­rit of the open source soft­ware and hard­ware move­ments, we hope to pro­mote mate­ri­als to be rese­ar­ched and deve­lo­ped in a public, col­la­bo­ra­tive man­ner. We see mate­ri­als as an open resource, and wish to esta­blish an open pro­cess for explo­ring and sha­ring kno­wledge, tech­ni­ques and appli­ca­ti­ons rela­ted to mate­ri­als science.

I’ll be con­duc­ting most of my hands-on rese­arch right here at AltLab. We’d love for you to be invol­ved if you are wor­king in these areas or inte­res­ted in lear­ning more about smart materials.

Paper and cardboard circuits

papercircuits_01
A cou­ple of years ago i found out on the “inter­nets” that you don’t really need a pro­to­bo­ard or a cir­cuit board to make your cir­cuits come to life, the idea was to fold a piece of paper with the cir­cuit design in it (com­po­nent side and cir­cuit dia­gram side) and then inser­ting a piece of card­bo­ard in the middle.

The main idea was the eco, recy­cled “thingy” since cir­cuit boards are not so eco fri­en­dly and take a bunch of time to get recy­cled by our mother earth, also the eco­no­mic side (paper and card­bo­ard are almost free), ins­tead cir­cuit boar­ding takes a long time and it’s hazar­dous for the environment.

papercircuits_02
So here’s what i do :

1– print the sche­ma­tic you want (be sure to include on the sheet of paper both sides of the sche­ma­tic (com­po­nent side and schematic)

2-fold it (the idea is to fold where the com­po­nent side meets the schematic)

3-cut a piece of card­bo­ard and insert it in the mid­dle of the sheet of paper

4-glue both sides on to the card­bo­ard (now you must have a beau­ti­full cir­cuit board made of cardboard)

5-with a nee­dle pierce (com­po­nent side) all dril­ling holes into sche­ma­tic side

6-insert the com­po­nents (resis­tors, ic, capa­ci­ta­tor etc..)

7-turn it back (sche­ma­tic side) and start to sol­der (be sure to folow the tra­ces on the paper), the best way to do this is to sim­ply bend the leads of the com­po­nents and sol­der them together, if you have a large area were the lead is not long enough just use a wire or something similar.

8-have fun

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